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A history of Singapore

in 51 objects

What do you think best captures Singapore in her 51st year of nationhood?

Browse our gallery of 50 illustrated icons of Singapore history, and explore more items in the National Museum of Singapore's National Collection through the links to the Roots website.

Find out which object successfully became the 51st object on our list to represent our present and future!

What do you think best captures Singapore in her 51st year of nationhood?

Browse through 50 icons of SG history, and explore others in the National Museum's collection.

Find out which object successfully became the 51st object on our list to represent our present and future!

Published: July 17, 2016 | Updated: Aug 5, 2016

By Teo Yu Sheng, Teo Yu Siang, Ong Sor Fern, and Rebecca Pazos

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Singapore Stone

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This piece of red sandstone inscribed with the earliest writing found in Singapore was part of a 3m by 3m boulder located at the mouth of the Singapore River, near the present-day Fullerton Hotel. When it was discovered in 1819, the rock had about 50 lines of ancient script on it. The British blew it up in 1843 to develop the area.

This piece of red sandstone inscribed with the earliest writing found in Singapore was part of a 3m by 3m boulder located at the mouth of the Singapore River, near the present-day Fullerton Hotel. When it was discovered in 1819, the rock had about 50 lines of ancient script on it. The British blew it up in 1843 to develop the area.

This piece of red sandstone inscribed with the earliest writing found in Singapore was part of a 3m by 3m boulder located at the mouth of the Singapore River, near the present-day Fullerton Hotel. When it was discovered in 1819, the rock had about 50 lines of ancient script on it. The British blew it up in 1843 to develop the area.

This piece of red sandstone inscribed with the earliest writing found in Singapore was part of a 3m by 3m boulder located at the mouth of the Singapore River, near the present-day Fullerton Hotel. When it was discovered in 1819, the rock had about 50 lines of ancient script on it. The British blew it up in 1843 to develop the area.

The last paragraph stone fragment, which is on display at the National Museum of Singapore, is evidence of an early civilisation in Singapore. Scholars say that the writing on the fragment could be in Sumatran or old Javanese, but no one has been able to decipher the writing.

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Era 1

10th Century - 1880s

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